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Quantumaniac is where it’s at - and by ‘it’ I mean awesome.

Over here I post a ton of physics / math / general interesting posts in an attempt to make your brain feel good. My aim is to be as informative as possible, all while posting fascinating things that hopefully enlighten us both a little to the mysteries of our truly wondrous universe(s?). Plus, how would you know if the blog exists or not unless you observe it? Boom, just pulled the Schrödinger’s cat card. Now you have to check it out - trust me, it said so in an equation somewhere.

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Best View Yet of Merging Galaxies in Distant Universe
Check out this awesome article from Astronomy.com:
An international team of astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), among other telescopes, has obtained the best view yet of a collision between two galaxies when the universe was only half its current age.
Check out the article to learn more about how what one scientist called “natural lenses created by the universe” helped to see this.
Unfortunately, a galactic collision is projected to happen between the Milky Way and Andromeda - but don’t worry, not for another 4 billion years. Check out a simulation video here

Instead of wondering when your next vacation is, maybe you set up a life you don’t need to escape from.

Seth Godin (via liberatingreality)

projecthabu:

     This Command Module was flown into space by Walter Schirra, Don Eisele and Walter Cunningham on Apollo 7, the first manned flight of the Apollo Program. On October 11, 1968, they became the only crew to fly from Launch complex 34 at Cape Canaveral, Florida, a launch complex which I have covered in a previous post (click here to view). The crew orbited the earth for 11 days, the length of a future Apollo Moon mission, testing the various Command Module systems.

     On this blog, one of the things I typically try to cover is test flight aircraft. This capsule qualifies, sort of. Apollo 7 was the first test flight of the command module system. Also, this spacecraft maneuvered through the air during re-entry, so we could, without too much of a stretch, call it an aircraft. There you have it. Test flight aircraft. Sounds good, right?

     This capsule is on display at the incredible Frontiers of Flight Museum in Dallas, Texas. I was very impressed with this museum. They have a pristine, non typical collection, beautiful facility, and very friendly, knowledgeable staff.

When you’re just starting to learn something new, the errors that you experience are helping you learn faster.

cerceos:

NASA
The Rose




The spinning vortex of Saturn’s north polar storm resembles a deep red rose of giant proportions surrounded by green foliage in this false-color image from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft. Measurements have sized the eye at a staggering 1,250 miles (2,000 kilometers) across with cloud speeds as fast as 330 miles per hour (150 meters per second).

cerceos:

NASA

The Rose

The spinning vortex of Saturn’s north polar storm resembles a deep red rose of giant proportions surrounded by green foliage in this false-color image from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft. Measurements have sized the eye at a staggering 1,250 miles (2,000 kilometers) across with cloud speeds as fast as 330 miles per hour (150 meters per second).
kqedscience:

Giant stinky Corpse Flower, blossoming
“The Huntington, a wonderful destination here in Los Angeles, has posted GIFs of the rare Corpse Flower blossoming. If you’re in Southern California, you gotta see it in person. The plant’s latin name, Amorphophallus titanum comes from Ancient Greek amorphos, “without form, misshapen” + phallos, “phallus”, and titan, “giant.”
(via BoingBoing)

kqedscience:

Giant stinky Corpse Flower, blossoming

The Huntington, a wonderful destination here in Los Angeles, has posted GIFs of the rare Corpse Flower blossoming. If you’re in Southern California, you gotta see it in person. The plant’s latin name, Amorphophallus titanum comes from Ancient Greek amorphos, “without form, misshapen” + phallos, “phallus”, and titan, “giant.”

(via BoingBoing)

spaceplasma:

On August 24th at 12:17 UT, NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory recorded this M5.6-category explosion near the eastern limb of the sun.

The source of the blast was sunspot AR2151. As the movie shows, an instability in the suspot’s magnetic canopy hurled a dense plume of plasma into space. If that plasma cloud were to hit Earth, the likely result would be strong geomagnetic storms. However, because of the sunspot’s location near the edge of the solar disk, Earth was not in the line of fire.

Even so, the flare did produce some Earth effects. A pulse of extreme UV radiation from the explosion partially ionized our planet’s upper atmosphere, resulting in a Sudden Ionospheric Disturbance (SID). Waves of ionization altered the normal propagation of VLF (very low frequency) radio transmissions over the the dayside of Earth, an effect recorded at the Polarlightcenter in Lofoten, Norway: data.

Credit: NASA/SDO