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Quantumaniac is where it’s at - and by ‘it’ I mean awesome.

Over here I post a ton of physics / math / general interesting posts in an attempt to make your brain feel good. My aim is to be as informative as possible, all while posting fascinating things that hopefully enlighten us both a little to the mysteries of our truly wondrous universe(s?). Plus, how would you know if the blog exists or not unless you observe it? Boom, just pulled the Schrödinger’s cat card. Now you have to check it out - trust me, it said so in an equation somewhere.

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The point, I take it, is to understand how nature works. Part of that is knowing how to do calculations, but another part is asking deep questions about what it all means. That’s what got me interested in science, anyway. And part of that task is understanding the foundational aspects of our physical picture of the world, digging deeply into issues that go well beyond merely being able to calculate things. It’s a shame that so many physicists don’t see how good philosophy of science can contribute to this quest. The universe is much bigger than we are and stranger than we tend to imagine, and I for one welcome all the help we can get in trying to figure it out.

Sean Carroll

Carroll, a Cal Tech physicist, defends the value of philosophy in science in a recent article. Recently, scientists such as Neil deGrasse Tyson have publicly slammed philosophy as “futile” and claiming that it has no place in answering the Big Questions about the nature of the universe.

What do you think? Does philosophy have a place in science today? Why or why not?

(via jtotheizzoe)

xysciences:

A domino can knock over another domino 1.5x larger than itself.
The above Gif shows a domino 5 millimeters tall starting a chain reaction 13 dominos long that eventually knocks over a domino about half a meter tall.
If the reaction was 29 dominos long, the final domino would be the size of the Empire State Building.
[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

xysciences:

A domino can knock over another domino 1.5x larger than itself.

The above Gif shows a domino 5 millimeters tall starting a chain reaction 13 dominos long that eventually knocks over a domino about half a meter tall.

If the reaction was 29 dominos long, the final domino would be the size of the Empire State Building.

[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

astronomicalwonders:

The Boomerang Nebula
The Hubble Space Telescope has “caught” the Boomerang Nebula in these new images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys. This reflecting cloud of dust and gas has two nearly symmetric lobes (or cones) of matter that are being ejected from a central star. Over the last 1,500 years, nearly one and a half times the mass of our Sun has been lost by the central star of the Boomerang Nebula in an ejection process known as a bipolar outflow. The nebula’s name is derived from its symmetric structure as seen from ground-based telescopes. Hubble’s sharp view is able to resolve patterns and ripples in the nebula very close to the central star that are not visible from the ground.
Astronomers are uncertain of the cause of bipolar outflow in this, and many other, young nebulae like the Boomerang. It may be that a disk of slow-moving material is situated around the equator of the star, thereby blocking more rapidly moving ejected material there, and allowing only matter closer to the poles to be ejected. Another consideration may be that magnetic fields are responsible for constraining the material and thus causing the double-lobed shape of the nebula.
Bipolar outflows are seen to occur both from very young stars (“protostars”) that are still in the process of collapsing and forming, and from old stars nearing the ends of their lives that have become bloated red giants. The Boomerang is believed to be the ejected outer layers from an old red giant. Each lobe of the Boomerang Nebula is nearly one light-year in length, making the total length of the nebula half as long as the distance from our Sun to our nearest neighbors- the Alpha Centauri stellar system, located roughly 4 light-years away.
Credit: NASA, ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team

astronomicalwonders:

The Boomerang Nebula

The Hubble Space Telescope has “caught” the Boomerang Nebula in these new images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys. This reflecting cloud of dust and gas has two nearly symmetric lobes (or cones) of matter that are being ejected from a central star. Over the last 1,500 years, nearly one and a half times the mass of our Sun has been lost by the central star of the Boomerang Nebula in an ejection process known as a bipolar outflow. The nebula’s name is derived from its symmetric structure as seen from ground-based telescopes. Hubble’s sharp view is able to resolve patterns and ripples in the nebula very close to the central star that are not visible from the ground.

Astronomers are uncertain of the cause of bipolar outflow in this, and many other, young nebulae like the Boomerang. It may be that a disk of slow-moving material is situated around the equator of the star, thereby blocking more rapidly moving ejected material there, and allowing only matter closer to the poles to be ejected. Another consideration may be that magnetic fields are responsible for constraining the material and thus causing the double-lobed shape of the nebula.

Bipolar outflows are seen to occur both from very young stars (“protostars”) that are still in the process of collapsing and forming, and from old stars nearing the ends of their lives that have become bloated red giants. The Boomerang is believed to be the ejected outer layers from an old red giant. Each lobe of the Boomerang Nebula is nearly one light-year in length, making the total length of the nebula half as long as the distance from our Sun to our nearest neighbors- the Alpha Centauri stellar system, located roughly 4 light-years away.

Credit: NASA, ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team

kqedscience:

Researchers successfully 3D print blood vessels, a ‘game changer’ for artificial organs
“Hundreds of thousands of people die annually because the demand for organs far exceeds the donor supply. Artificial organs could save those lives — and scientists just made a huge breakthrough in the field by “bio-printing” artificial vascular networks.
Researchers from the University of Sydney, MIT, Harvard, and Stanford have successfully bio-printed blood vessels, offering 3D-printed organs access to nutrients, oxygen, and waste-disposal routes, according to a study published Monday.”
Read more from Venture Beat.

kqedscience:

Researchers successfully 3D print blood vessels, a ‘game changer’ for artificial organs

Hundreds of thousands of people die annually because the demand for organs far exceeds the donor supply. Artificial organs could save those lives — and scientists just made a huge breakthrough in the field by “bio-printing” artificial vascular networks.

Researchers from the University of Sydney, MIT, Harvard, and Stanford have successfully bio-printed blood vessels, offering 3D-printed organs access to nutrients, oxygen, and waste-disposal routes, according to a study published Monday.”

Read more from Venture Beat.

sixpenceee:

According to a study in the journal Animal Cognition, chimpanzee’s do something that seems altogether arbitrary: ear accoutrements.

“Our observation is quite unique in the sense that nothing seems to be communicated by it,” says study author Edwin van Leeuwen, a primate expert at the Max Planck Institute in The Netherlands.

To figure out if this was really a tradition, and not just chimpanzees sticking grass in their ears at random, van Leeuwen and his colleagues spent a year observing four chimp groups in Chimfunshi Wildlife Orphanage Trust, a sanctuary in Zambia.

There’s no genetic or ecological factors, the scientists believe, that would account for this behavior — only culture.

Chimpanzees putting grass in their ears is like us wearing earrings. 

SOURCE & MORE INFORMATION

wapiti3:

Common mushrooms of the United States / by Louis C. C. Krieger on Flickr.

Publication info Washington :National Geographic Society,1920.
Contributing Library:
Dorothy H. Hoover Library, Ontario College of Art & Design
BioDiv. Library

illusionaryish:

Imagine if the whole, beautifully paved world looked like this.
These are solar panels that, if placed in the place of roadways and other paving sites (parking lots, parks, etc) can produce more renewable energy than the entire country produces. 
It’s currently in the prototype stage with amazing results. Plus, they can be used in all weather situations that will also make icy roads a thing of the past. Heating elements will melt any ice and snow that sits on top. Another thing, they come with LEDs inside so that you’ll have a better view of the road as you drive. All powered by solar energy. 
I Fucking Love Science posted an article about it and it’s also raising money on indiegogo, which is disgustingly far from the goal. They have some pretty sweet gifts, including bumper stickers, a necklace containing pieces of the prototypes, and an entire working prototype of the plates.
BONUS: The prototypes were made of 10% recycled plastic AND can still handle the heaviest trucks. Imagine what the final product could do.
I urge everyone to at least reblog and spread the message so that hopefully this reaches the goal at May 31st. Projects like this hit me right in the heart because of my passion for renewable energy, which is what I hope to deal with once I’m done with my Engineering degree. I would gladly work on this project if I could, but for now I’m going to settle with donating as much as I can and spreading the word as far as possible.
So, signal boost! <3

illusionaryish:

Imagine if the whole, beautifully paved world looked like this.

These are solar panels that, if placed in the place of roadways and other paving sites (parking lots, parks, etc) can produce more renewable energy than the entire country produces. 

It’s currently in the prototype stage with amazing results. Plus, they can be used in all weather situations that will also make icy roads a thing of the past. Heating elements will melt any ice and snow that sits on top. Another thing, they come with LEDs inside so that you’ll have a better view of the road as you drive. All powered by solar energy. 

I Fucking Love Science posted an article about it and it’s also raising money on indiegogo, which is disgustingly far from the goal. They have some pretty sweet gifts, including bumper stickers, a necklace containing pieces of the prototypes, and an entire working prototype of the plates.

BONUS: The prototypes were made of 10% recycled plastic AND can still handle the heaviest trucks. Imagine what the final product could do.

I urge everyone to at least reblog and spread the message so that hopefully this reaches the goal at May 31st. Projects like this hit me right in the heart because of my passion for renewable energy, which is what I hope to deal with once I’m done with my Engineering degree. I would gladly work on this project if I could, but for now I’m going to settle with donating as much as I can and spreading the word as far as possible.

So, signal boost! <3

science-junkie:

Illustris Simulation of the Universe
Video Credit: Illustris Collaboration, NASA, PRACE, XSEDE, MIT, Harvard CfA

How did we get here? Click play, sit back, and watch. A new computer simulation of the evolution of the universe — the largest and most sophisticated yet produced — provides new insight into how galaxies formed and new perspectives into humanity’s place in the universe.

Read More