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Quantumaniac is where it’s at - and by ‘it’ I mean awesome.

Over here I post a ton of physics / math / general interesting posts in an attempt to make your brain feel good. My aim is to be as informative as possible, all while posting fascinating things that hopefully enlighten us both a little to the mysteries of our truly wondrous universe(s?). Plus, how would you know if the blog exists or not unless you observe it? Boom, just pulled the Schrödinger’s cat card. Now you have to check it out - trust me, it said so in an equation somewhere.

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biovisual:

Baby Squid Photography by Jeannot Kuenzel - Malta
All rights reserved by Jeannot Kuenzel
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Posted on Flickr March 29 and 31, 2014

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EGGS of Loligo vulgaris: the European squid, a large squid belonging to the family Loliginidae.

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Two stages of the development of a [European squid] are visible in the picture. These eggs are about 3mm in diameter; when the little squid inside has used up all the nutrients (all the yolk that is attached to it), it plops its suckers to the inside of the diaphragm and releases enzymes that will aid opening the shell, pushing through the opening - and a tiny new ALIEN of the DEEP is born :]

Notice the CHROMATOPHORES already embedded in its skin and the tiny little SIPHON… BTW, the SQUID on the left is actually laying on its back…

molecularlifesciences:

Top 5 misconceptions about evolution: A guide to demystify the foundation of modern biology.

Version 1.0

Here is an infographic to help inform citizens.  From my experience most people who misunderstand evolution are actually misinformed about what science is and how it operates.  That said, here are five of the biggest barriers faced when one explains evolution - I have faced these and they are documented in the literature.

I hope you can build on my work and improve the communication between the scientists and the public.

Want to do more?  If you want to donate to the cause of science education I suggest the National Center for Science Education http://ncse.com, your local university, or an equivalent organization.  Volunteering at schools and inviting scientists into classrooms are two ways to encourage an informed society.  Attend hearings if school boards start questioning evolution’s role in public curriculum.  Raise a storm if anyone tries to ban science.  Plus, it never hurts to reblog a well made evolution post.

Thank you followers for all your support!
Love, 
molecularlifesciences.tumblr.com

jtotheizzoe:

Best Astrophotography of the Year, as chosen by the Royal Observatory Greenwich.

From both an existential and purely technical/photographic aspect, these shots blow my mind. Check out the full gallery of winners at My Modern Met.

(Top two images by Mark Gee, bottom image by Adam Block)

Bonus: Check out grand prize winner Mark Gee’s breathtaking video of a rising moon and tiny human silhouettes, pointing at it and ooh-ing and ahh-ing and generally marveling at the lunar awesomeness. It’s just … wow.

nanodash:

sci-universe:

A few months before he died, Carl Sagan recorded a moving message which he dedicated to future explorers and settlers of Mars. 7 years later, the first succesful landing of a long-term rover to the red planet’s surface was achieved. In 2012, the Curiosity rover (its self-portrait on the image) landed on Mars and is still going.

There’s very little that captivates me more than the Mars exploration, I remember being so excited when Curiosity landed. And that excitement is with damn good reason.

nanodash:

sci-universe:

A few months before he died, Carl Sagan recorded a moving message which he dedicated to future explorers and settlers of Mars. 7 years later, the first succesful landing of a long-term rover to the red planet’s surface was achieved. In 2012, the Curiosity rover (its self-portrait on the image) landed on Mars and is still going.

There’s very little that captivates me more than the Mars exploration, I remember being so excited when Curiosity landed. And that excitement is with damn good reason.

There’s as many atoms in a single molecule of your DNA as there are stars in the typical galaxy. We are, each of us, a little universe.

Neil deGrasse Tyson, Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey (Ep 2: Some of the Things that Molecules Do)

(Source: ckerouac)