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Quantumaniac is where it’s at - and by ‘it’ I mean awesome.

Over here, I post a ton of astronomy / math / general science in an attempt to make your brain feel good. My aim is to be as informative as possible, while posting fascinating things that hopefully enlighten us both a little to the mysteries of our truly wondrous universe(s?). Plus, how would you know if the blog exists or not unless you observe it?

Boom, just pulled the Schrödinger’s cat card. Now you have to check it out - trust me, it said so in an equation somewhere.

Also, please check out my web design company - O8 Labs

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First Zero-G Wedding

Noah Fulmor and Erin Finnegan (above and below) became the first couple to get married in weightless conditions on June 20, 2009.

The Physics of Straws
Straws, how complicated can they be? Most people have a few misconceptions about how straws work, but just like everything else - the answer lies with physics. 
Upon placing the straw in a regular cup of water, the pressures inside and outside of the straw are equal! You can see this by noticing that the level of the water and in the glass are the same - both reach the same height of the straw. 

When you suck on the straw, you are effectively decreasing the pressure in your mouth - and this lowers the pressure at the top of the straw. As soon as this happens, the force of the atmosphere pushing on the water in the glass is higher than the force of the gases inside the straw. Since pressure acts from high to low, the atmosphere forces the liquid water up the straw. In essence, you are not sucking the water into your mouth, but the atmosphere is pushing it! 
Explain this to your friends the next time you’re out to eat - then write down a few bogus equations and they’ll think you’re a genius. 

The Physics of Straws

Straws, how complicated can they be? Most people have a few misconceptions about how straws work, but just like everything else - the answer lies with physics. 

Upon placing the straw in a regular cup of water, the pressures inside and outside of the straw are equal! You can see this by noticing that the level of the water and in the glass are the same - both reach the same height of the straw. 

When you suck on the straw, you are effectively decreasing the pressure in your mouth - and this lowers the pressure at the top of the straw. As soon as this happens, the force of the atmosphere pushing on the water in the glass is higher than the force of the gases inside the straw. Since pressure acts from high to low, the atmosphere forces the liquid water up the straw. In essence, you are not sucking the water into your mouth, but the atmosphere is pushing it! 

Explain this to your friends the next time you’re out to eat - then write down a few bogus equations and they’ll think you’re a genius.